Diamond and Diamond AB
ALBERTA OFFICES

Calgary Main Office

1331 Macleod Trail SE, Suite 420

Edmonton Head Office

4246 97 Street NW, Unit 100

B.C. Offices

Surrey Consultation Office

1104 – 13737 96 Ave, Surrey, BC V3V 0C6

Kelowna Consultation Office

1631 Dickson Avenue Suite 1100

Vancouver Head Office

1727 West Broadway, Suite 400

ONTARIO OFFICES

Oshawa Consultation Office

50 Richmond Street E, Unit # 108 B

Brampton Consultation Office

341 Parkhurst Square, Suite 5

Etobicoke Consultation Office

34 Greensboro Dr 2nd Floor

Toronto Head Office

255 Consumers Road, 5th Floor

Sudbury Consultation Office

144 Elm Street, Suite 201

Ottawa Main Office

955 Greenvalley Crescent, Unit 315

Oakville Office

2939 Portland Drive, Suite 200

London Main Office

256 Pall Mall St, Suite 102

Hamilton Consultation Office

105 Main Street East, Suite 1500

Barrie Main Office

17 Poyntz Street

Windsor Main Office

13158 Tecumseh Rd. E. Unit 3B

Thunder Bay Consultation Office

278 Algoma Street South

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Severe Emotional Trauma Caused by Dog Bites

A dog attack can be an emotionally scarring event, especially for children. Beyond the physical repercussions of the attack, there are myriad psychological stressors that can accompany such an event. 

If you or a loved one have been recently attacked by a dog, make sure to know what symptoms of dog bite trauma to look for and how to help. Luckily, the expert personal injury lawyers at Diamond & Diamond are here to take the pressure off.

What to Do if Bitten by a Dog

In the event of a dog bite, make sure to wash the wound immediately. You should run warm tap water over the bite for about 10 minutes before applying any treatments. If you cannot access water right away, make sure to wrap the injury in a clean (or as clean as you can find) cloth to stop the bleeding.

Apply an over-the-counter antibacterial cream to the wound to keep it from getting infected. You should wrap the wound in a sterile bandage until you can bring it to a doctor. Once your doctor has examined the injury, ensure cleanliness by changing the bandage a couple of times a day. 

After you’ve dealt with the wound, make sure you know what additional steps to take. These include contacting the police and filing a report, as well as following up with your doctor at a later date. If you’re a dog owner and are worried about your pet getting loose and accidentally hurting someone, check out these precautionary tips.

Emotional Effects of Dog Bites on Children

The emotional pain that accompanies the physical wound of a dog attack on children is greater than we can comprehend. For starters, while the adult brain has matured enough to be able to process these events, the child’s brain hasn’t. 

Also, you must consider the size difference; a dog is comparable to a bear when facing a small child. Make sure you know what are the symptoms of dog bite trauma. These include bedwetting, crying, sleep disturbances, withdrawal, and fear.

The best thing you can do if your child has been attacked by a dog is to know your rights and bite-related laws. If your dog has recently attacked someone, it may also be your responsibility to financially cover for that emotional trauma.

Documenting Emotional Trauma

It’ll become increasingly important in the days and weeks following the attack to document any sort of trauma you or your loved one is experiencing. Physical wounds can be documented through photographs, but night terrors and post-traumatic stress (PTSD) are harder to show to the court.

Keep a journal of the types of medications you take to treat the injury as well as the emotional journey. Be vivid in describing how the stress of the event impacts day-to-day life. This will be critical in determining what type of damages are in play and what the owner will cover.

Additional Info Related to Dog Bite Trauma

Where to get information in Alberta about dog bites

What to Do If Your Dog Bites Someone

  • Remove the animal from the situation
  • Help the bite victim wash and wrap the wound
  • Remain calm and understanding
  • Offer to call the doctor or police for them

Therapy for Dog Bite Victims

  • Dog bites symptoms include PTSD and night terrors
  • Talking to a psychologist is a crucial first step
  • Journaling helps keep track of medicine and feelings

If you’ve been the victim of a dog bite in Alberta, contact Diamond & Diamond Law for a free evaluation of your case and start down the road to recovery today.

Pro Tip

“To better understand a child’s reaction to a dog bite, an adult should imagine being attacked by a larger animal such as a bear.” – BrokerLink

Why Choose Diamond & Diamond Law

If you’re looking for a dog bite lawyer in Alberta, especially in Calgary or Edmonton, look no further than Diamond & Diamond Law. Our team of professionals will be able to help you get the justice you deserve. 

Call 1-800-567-HURT (4878) to get a free consultation. All consultations are entirely confidential.

Severe Emotional Trauma Caused by Dog Bites FAQs

Can you get nerve damage from a dog bite?

Yes. One of the serious, common effects of a dog bite is nerve damage. Dogs have incredibly strong jaws and sharp teeth, making it easy for them to tear through the skin. This is especially true with younger children. The three main types of nerve damage received in these cases are neurapraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis.

A police dog bit me -- can I sue?

Yes. This process is a bit long-winded, as it requires you to file a governmental tort claim. The liability of police dogs will differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, either falling on the direct owners or the government itself. You’ll want to clear ownership and liability up with the specific police department in question before pursuing legal action.

Will a dog be put down for biting someone?

Sometimes. It will depend on the jurisdiction within which the accident occurred. Canadian law allows officials to confiscate and destroy animals that are guilty of biting someone in a vicious manner.

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